N.P. Ry.

T

Files from the Office of the Chief Engineer of the Northern Pacific Railway at the Minnesota Historical Society





The Minnesota Historical Society received the corporate records of the Northern Pacific Railway, the Great Northern Railway and the Spokane Portland and Seattle Railway with the creation of the Burlington Northern Railroad in 1970.

MHS' address is:
345 Kellogg Boulevard West
Saint Paul, Minnesota 55102-1906
MHS Web Site

This information is ordered by:
MHS Box Number
NP File Number
Subject
Additional notes (if any)


TACOMA

Tacoma was the western terminus of the NP, being reached by Pacific Division construction crews building north from Kalama (on the Columbia River) in 1873. It was the site of extensive NP facilities, including a headquarters building, a main backshop and a large Union Station. (Built in 1909, this station is now a United States Courthouse). From its construction until the Burlington Northern merger of 1970, this building served as the Division offices, including Division Superintendent, Engineer, Chief Dispatcher and dispatching offices.

134.H.3.10F
FILE 403
SOUTH TACOMA: SHOPS

134.I.6.3B
FILE 971
SOUTH TACOMA SHOPS: ADDITION

134.I.11.6F
FILE 3579
TACOMA: DEPOT

134.H.1.5B
FILE 43
TACOMA: GENERAL FILE

134.I.16.10F
FILE 6354
TACOMA: GENERAL FILE

134.I.8.12F
FILE 1711
TACOMA: OLD OFFICE BUILDING RECORDS

134.H.3.3B
FILE 255-1
TACOMA: SERVICE BUILDINGS

134.I.13.5B
FILE 4438
TACOMA: UNION STATION

TACOMA DIVISION

The Tacoma Division became the final incarnation of the NP in western Washington. Extending from Oregon in the south to Canada in the north, it reached every major town in western Washington and also controlled the NP's line over Stampede Pass.

134.K.9.4F
FILE 11900
TACOMA DIVISION: DEPOT HEATER INSTALLATION

134.K.9.13B
FILE 12260
TACOMA DIVISION: GREEN RIVER RIP-RAP

134.K.9.14F
FILE 12328
TACOMA DIVISION: INSPECTION BUILDINGS

134.K.7.9B
FILE 11066
TACOMA DIVISION: PASSING TRACK EXTENSION

134.I.7.9B
FILE 1432
TACOMA DIVISION: RIGHT OF WAY

Blue print maps of Napavine, Winlock, the South Bend Branch, the South Bend vicinity, the Kangley vicinity, the Wapato vicinity, and the Tracy Branch on the Pasco Division.

134.I.6.1B
FILE 914
PACIFIC & TACOMA DIVISION: SPURS

Morgan Lumber Company leases dating from 1910, two in 1911, two in 1912, and 1917. Tracks to connect respectively with the NP at Hot Springs, Maywood, Weston and Nagrom. Note stating the tracks were later assigned to Howe-McGibbon in a memo dated August 24, 1949. Maywood at Mile Post 65, Howe-McGibbon assigned tracks here by September 29, 1926. Moore Mining Company spur at Palmer was built in 1901. One copy of contract and trackage map for Howe-McGibbon Timber Company at Nagrom, September 29, 1926. Oversize, three pages.

THRALL

Thrall is a small farming community between Ellensburg and Yakima. It lies at the mouth of the Yakima Canyon.

134.I.18.11B
FILE 7224
THRALL: GENERAL FILE

TUNNELS

134.I.19.1B
FILE 7394
TUNNEL REPAIR, CASCADE

134.I.20.2F
FILE 7862
TUNNELS

STAMPEDE TUNNEL

Stampede Tunnel (Tunnel 3) is a 1.8 mile masonry- and brick-lined bore at Stampede Pass. It saved the NP from climbing over an additional 600 feet to the summit of the pass, and was completed by subcontractor Nelson Bennett in May, 1888. It had ten mile approaches of 2.2 percent grades to both the east and west and received a ventilation plant at its western portal in 1914. Both portals had extensive snowsheds and small support facilities. The station at its western portal is Stampede, Martin is in the east.

134.H.4.1B
FILE 449
STAMPEDE TUNNEL

134.I.4.12F
FILE 13
STAMPEDE TUNNEL

Stampede Tunnel accounting ledgers for 1893.

134.I.12.3B
FILE 3876
STAMPEDE TUNNEL

Contract with the Winston Brothers of Minneapolis for the lining in Stampede Tunnel in 1922. The contract was for 60 men working in the tunnel at $0.40 per hour. Fewer and fewer workers were on the job from day one and the NP's Engineering office kept track of just how few. Daily tables show the Winston Brothers crews declining from just over 50 to under a dozen over a few months time. On June 6, 1922, those left at the tunnel threw in the sponge. Complaining of poor food and lousy conditions they went on strike for an eight hour day. An eight hours which the NP's Principal Assistant Engineer Asahel R. Cook wryly noted to William L. Darling: "...Do not correspond with those we can have in the Tunnel." On July 14 Howard E. Stevens, the NP's Chief Engineer wired the Winston Brothers: "Mr. Cook wires on the 13th that all laborers at Stampede quit after breakfast this morning."
One copy of telegram, Asahel R. Cook to H.E. Stevens, July 14, 1922.
One copy of telegram, Howard E. Stevens to Winston Brothers, July 14, 1922.

134.I.20.3B
FILE 7893
STAMPEDE TUNNEL

138.E.2.4
FILE 64-1, 64-3
STAMPEDE TUNNEL

134.I.5.3B
FILE 384
STAMPEDE TUNNEL: GENERAL FILE

1 copy of a report from Herbert S. Huson, Division Engineer, to General Adna Anderson, Engineer-in-Chief, Tacoma, April 20, 1887. Date, name, type of injury, date of dispatch from hospital, if any, and which end of tunnel worked at for men injured at Stampede Tunnel to March 23, 1887. Oversize, three pages.
One copy of a reply to inquiry by James Dun, Chief Engineer, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway by Edwin H. McHenry, Chief Engineer, St. Paul, February 7, 1901. McHenry answer to the Santa Fe's inquiry about cost of building and maintenance troubles at Stampede Tunnel. Two pages.
One copy of a report to John W. Kendrick, Chief Engineer, St. Paul, Herbert S. Huson, Principal Assistant Engineer, Tacoma, February 20, 1891. Estimates for tunnel materials needed at Stampede Tunnel in 1891. One page.
One copy of a report to John W. Kendrick by Andrew Gibson, Assistant Engineer, Martin, March 15, 1898. Story of Gibson's employment on the NP. Three pages.
One copy of "Stampede Tunnel" by Andrew Gibson, Assistant Engineer, Martin, February 16, 1898. Statistics and costs for the tunnel. Oversize, Six pages.
One copy of a report to Bernard Blum, Chief Engineer, St. Paul, by W. D. Clarke, American Society of Civil Engineers. Copy in the collection of D. D. Clarke, NP, of an Andrew Gibson report on Stampede Tunnel statistics and costs circa February 16, 1898. Six pages.

134.K.1.2F
FILE 8333
STAMPEDE TUNNEL: LIGHTING

1 copy of a contract from the Northwestern Electric Supply and Construction Company to Herbert S. Huson, Principal Assistant Engineer, Tacoma, June 20, 1888. Four pages.
One copy of a memo from Herbert S. Huson to S. D. Mason, Principal Assistant Engineer, St. Paul, August 25, 1888. A typo costing $1,000 to be added to the contract. One page.

136.K.12.2F
FILE 64
STAMPEDE TUNNEL: LINING

1 copy of a report from Andrew Gibson, Assistant Engineer, Martin, to Herbert S. Huson, Principal Assistant Engineer, Tacoma, January 1, 1891. Report on costs of lining in 1890. One page.
One copy of a report from Charles S. Bihler, Western Divisions Engineer, Tacoma, to Edwin H. McHenry, Chief Engineer, St. Paul, July 16, 1895. Transmittal of a report by Andrew Gibson on June 20, 1895 of the cost of lining Stampede Tunnel for the year ending July 30, 1895. Oversize, seven pages.
One copy of a report from Andrew Gibson, Assistant Engineer to Herbert S. Huson, Principal Assistant Engineer, Tacoma, January 19, 1891. Progress report.
Three pages.

134.I.16.13B
FILE 6460
STAMPEDE TUNNEL: VENTILATION

Years 1919-1926. Photos and blue prints from photos. Notes on fire protection needs at the vent plant, photos of construction and layout of the plant and area. Reference to an article on the plant and tunnel, Railway Age Gazette, August 6, 1915.

134.K.2.4F
FILE 9117
STAMPEDE TUNNEL: VENTILATION

134.I.15.12F
STAMPEDE: VENTILATION PLANT

Blowup between Thomas Z. Krumm and Sturtevant Fan Company. The fans arrived at Stampede without laborers from Sturtevant to install them, on April 14, 1915. The fan foundations were poured and ready by the 17th. They were to be powered by a 4,150 horsepower boiler.

134.I.12.12F
FILE 4240
STAMPEDE TUNNEL: WEEKLY REPORTS

December 1913: Eight men and Foreman working at excavating, two more gangs to be added the week of December 6.
January, 1914: Outside excavation.
February: Creek channel change.
March: Building forms for concrete.
April: Concrete work.
May: Pump house started, timbers framed for coal dock.
June: Raising coal dock.
September: Coal dock appliances and coal storage in place, tracks laid and ballasted, engine and fans up and running to 60 percent of capacity, able to keep smoke four lengths ahead of engines.

TURNTABLES

134.B.11.13F
FILE 817
LESTER: TURNTABLE

Motor added circa 1924, George Nichols & Brothers, Chicago, Illinois. Eighty-five-foot standard.

134.K.9.9B
FILE 11967
LESTER: TURNTABLE

On August 3, 1960 James Poe of Yakima was dismantling the turntable when a forklift tipped and pinned him against the wall of the turntable, he was pulled out and taken to Cle Elum on Number 26. Sent by Worthington C. Smith.
On May 6, 1953, the Bridge Engineer inquired if the turntable from Dickinson, N.D., was needed at Lester. It was dissembled at a point and sent to South Tacoma, but was never reinstalled.
The Assistant Chief Engineer James T. Derrig noted cracks in the members and excessive wear and imbalance caused by pushing the rotaries across it with engines. Eighty-five-foot standard turntables were installed at Dickinson, Lester, Ellensburg and Tacoma in 1905.

134.B.11.13F
FILE 807
TOPPENISH: TURNTABLE

134.H.4.3B
FILE 606
TURNTABLE: GENERAL FILE

134.I.5.1B
FILE 341
TURNTABLES

134.I.10.8F
FILE 2953
TURNTABLES

134.K.8.5B
FILE 11254
YAKIMA: TURNTABLE



Author: John A. Phillips, III. Title: Files from the Office of the Chief Engineer of the Northern Pacific Railway at the Minnesota Historical Society, T. URL: pw2.netcom.com/~whstlpnk/mhst.html.

© September 9, 2000

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