N.P. Ry.

The Green River and Northern Railroad, 1890.

Correspondence from the Northern Pacific Collection at the University of Montana, Missoula, Montana.



The Green River and Northern Railroad was a subsidiary of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Because the Northern Pacific’s 1864 charter forbid the construction of branch lines, construction was carried on under the name of another corporation chartered in the state the line was to be built in.

The Green River and Northern was tasked with completing a branch line to the mines, and later mills, north of Kanaskat, Washington. Ultimately the line stretched many miles into the woods, reaching, at one point, nearly to North Bend. Among the mining towns and mill towns the future Green River Branch served were Kanaskat, Durham, Kangley, Selleck. Later, as the line pushed further to the north, it reached places such as Barneston and Kerriston.

For more information see the Tacoma Public Library’s Washington State Place Names Database (a link is included at the bottom of this page). For maps of the area see TopoZone.com. Use TopoZone’s Place Name Search for Palmer, Durham, Kanaskat, Kangley, or Selleck to begin your search.



Camp

April 18, 1890

 

Mr. Geo. B. Williams-

Durham.

 

Dear sir:

 

The bearer of this time order is Thos. McKeon, discharged. Give him a pass from Durham to Tacoma. – I will probably be in Durham sometime to-morrow – Saturday.

 

Yours truly,

Frank Bartlett.

 

---

 

Camp at Humbug Creek

April 22, 1890

 

Mr. Geo. B. Williams

Durham, Wash.

 

Dear sir:

 

Hereafter, when you send mail by messenger to this camp, please wrap it securely with heavy paper, and seal with wax.

 

Yours truly,

Frank Bartlett

 

This letter will be given to you by Fred Coatney – and with him is G. H. Lett, the cook for Case’s Camp. Lett will cook at headquarters until Van Alstine arrives, or until Mr. Case needs him. In the meantime, before Coatney and Lett go to camp, they can be moving the material from the depot to headquarters.

 

---

 

Cedar River

May 28, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst Engineer

Durham: --

 

Enclosed please find my time return for May, leaving Geo. H. Cook for your roll.

 

Will you please explain your views in regard to the use of 15 foot 6 inch and 20 foot plans in trestles; in which cases you would use the one or the other. I know you are opposed to the long span on sharp curves but am not sure you wish to follow that. I have but one high trestle on a tangent Sta. 140 “B.” The enclosed bill of material was planned from 20 foot spans on mud sills.

 

Resp’y yours,

Fred E. Case

 

Please return by Frid., level notes of “L” Location. In making progress profile would it not be better to leave “L” and “B” locations blank for this month and allow a correct profile including changes to be added for next month’s progress? F.E.C.

 

---

 

Cedar River

May 29, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett

Asst Engr

 

Please furnish me with the following supplies: Baking Powder, Sugar, Apricots, Peaches, Tomatoes, Chow Chow, Beef, Bacon, Milk.

 

Fred E. Case

 

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Cedar River

June 4, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett

Asst Eng’r:--

 

Have made arrangements with Mr. King to furnish me with beef at 15 c., but your packer will have to deliver it. Twice a week he will deliver to Archie at his camp 30 pounds. Please send me a case of milk.

 

Resp’y yours,

Fred E. Case

 

Am out of beef now so please have Archie call there on his first trip out.

 

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Cedar River

June 4, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst Eng’r

Durham.

 

Archie O’Callaghan would like to put in a claim against the N. P. B. A. for $300 paid Dr. Welsh for treatment of his foot. Can he get this refunded or are only Company surgeons allowed to operate on employees for the association?

 

Resp’y yours,

Fred E. Case

 

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Raging River

June 10, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett, Esq.

 

Dear Sir

 

Please send the following groceries, viz., 1 Case Peaches, 1 Case Tomatoes, 1 Case Pease, 1 Case Tea, 1 Case Eggs, Bacon and Ham (canvassed), Onions, Carrots.

 

Please oblige,

Geo. H. Cook

 

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Cedar River

June 10, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett

Asst Eng’r

Durham

 

Please furnish me with the following supplies: -- Coffee, Tea, Apricots, Soda, Ketchup, Nutmeg, Syrup, Raisins, Hops, Cheese, Eggs, Lard, Onions, Oat meal.

 

Fred E. Case

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs

Contractor

Cor. 23d and Adams Streets,

Tacoma.

 

June 22, 1890

 

List of Contractors on D Line

Chas. Rasmussen commencing at Sta. 0 to Sta. 60

W. S. Fortner commencing at Sta. 60 to Sta. 120

L. M. Lundgren commencing at Sta. 215 to Sta. 307

E. H. Randall commencing at Sta. 307 to Sta. 327

Coughlin [and] Co. commencing at Sta. 327 to Sta. 352

 

Mr. Bartlett

Asst Engineer

 

Dear Sir,

 

In giving a contract we always state to such a station or as the Engineer may direct.

 

Yours truly,

E. Reardon, Supt.

 

---

 

Office of the Division Superintendent

June 26, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Div. Engineer, Durham Wash.

 

Dear Sir.

 

Your letter regarding Dr. Geo. Welsh read. I have offered him our [] and a pass to Tacoma but he wants regular fees and transportation for himself wife all over the Earth. This we cannot stand. Wont you help us out all you can. I have written to see if they have a Dr. at Weston. Don’t call on him unless actually necessary. I think he has an immense amount of “Gall.” Will you please write me if you are going to extend beyond Palmer, or build any more where you will be liable to need him. Plse let me known soon.

 

Very truly Yours.

 

Jno. J. Buckley

Chf. Surgeon

 

---

 

Ranging River Camp

July 4, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Ass’t. Engr.

Durham Wash.

 

Dear Sir,

 

I beg leave to make the following reports of soundings at Echo Lake. To begin with the rods reached the end of the wagon road all more or less bent [and] sprung. They bring to long to lay supported much over half their length on the wagon bed. They will average 19 ft. long, each section. The blacksmith who has to put a point in one put one point in each rod. This made it impossible to jam more than two sections in one length. Fortunately, we have no soundings requiring more than the length of two.

 

We found the sand [and] muck pull at legs, laying in all directions, make it very difficult to get the rod through to clear soundings. We managed to get them in nine (9) different places [and] reached hard gravel in all but one which was [] 5 ft. out in the lake from the line near the P.I. of curve. There we reached stiff mud in 40 ft. of depth.

 

All the other soundings were within 20 ft. of outer line. They were as follows:

 

Soundings – Echo Lake.

No. of Sounding – Depth – Natural State – Remark

1 – 30 [ft.] – Gravel – Near center of crossing [and] 20 ft. [] from line

2 – 25 [ft.] – Gravel – Do

3 – 40 [ft.] – Stiff sand – Near center of crossing [and] [] 50 ft. left or out in lake from line

4 – 34 [ft.] – Gravel – Near center of crossing [and] 20 ft. out []

5 – 25 [ft.] – Gravel – Near line in center of []

6 – 18 [ft.] – Gravel – 25 ft. from north shore on line

7 – 21 [ft.] – Gravel – 25 ft. from north shore 20 [ft.] out []

8 – 21 [ft.] – Gravel -- Near line in center of crossing

9 – 3 [ft.] – Gravel – Near south edge of crossing

 

Yours truly,

Wm. J. Gould

Resd’t. Engr.

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs,

Railroad Contractor,

Cor. 23d and Adams Sts.,

Tacoma, Wash.,

 

July 7, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett, Esq.,

Asst. Eng’r

Durham, Wash.

 

My Dear Sir:

 

Your favor of 5th int., with enclosures of estimates for May and June received, and I am under obligations for the same. It was my understanding with Mr. [Herbert S.] Huson that the subs. doing the work were to have duplicate estimate of work performed by them from the Engineering Department in order to prevent their feeling that there was anything different made up by men then the original estimate made by you on the line. If you will give each one of them a copy of the estimate of the work that they performed during these months it will be perfectly proper and quite a satisfaction to me as well as them.

 

I am in hopes that we will get better weather and be able to push that work in good shape, but it has been fearful so far.

 

I remain, Very truly yours,

C. W. Griggs

 

---

 

Cedar River

July 8, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst Eng’r.

 

Herewith I hand you corrected bill of material for iron used on Cedar River Residency. The change on length of stringers and bolts in superstructure occur in bridges at Section 8, Stations 161 – 177 – 195 and Section 9 Sta. 139. I have made the corresponding changes on my bills.

 

Fred E. Case

Resident Engr.

 

---

 

Cedar River

July 9, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett

Asst Eng’r—

 

In Section 3, Station 300 and 310, the work is waiting for the cribs and in order to get the point cut in shape they must work both ends. Mr. King has some crib men waiting and if you have no objections to their working without the plans I will start them out to-morrow. If so, please tell me at whit distance from the center cribs are usually placed and doe it rise in height to about 1/2 foot above where the slope strikes it. They should be bolted together I suppose by 3/4 x 22 inch drift bolts about every five feet in length. The drift bolts for these cribs are not estimated in the bill for iron sent you yesterday.

 

Resp’y yours,

Fred E. Case

 

Please give Joe a small measurement book.

 

---

 

Raging River Camp

July 14, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Ass’t Engr.

Durham Wash.

 

Dear Sir

 

They will be ready for us to cross-section at Echo Lake about Monday July 14. While I am there, I thought it would be best to do as much as possible [and] change the line as you spoke of [and] extend it. This will require being there several days or the best part of a week. Would it not be a good idea to let us have one of the pack animals for that week to carry our blankets [and] supplies. We can not carry them [and] the tools as the hauling is so bad [and] the distances too great.

 

If you think this advisable I can have a packer loan us a horse and his [] Friday next.

 

Yours truly,

Wm. J. Gould

Resd’t. Engr.

 

---

 

Raging River Camp

July 18, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Ass’t Eng’r.

Durham Wash.

 

Dear Sir

 

We have spent this week up to date at Echo Lake where we have retraced the line around the bluffs. All stakes [] destroyed in clearing. This, with checking it up [and] resurfacing line was all of Monday P.M. [and] Tuesday all day. Wednesday [and] Thursday we extended the line from Sta. 347 to 369. Our preliminary [] [and] set out clearing sketches on Thursday. []

 

I left a party at the lake where they are to begin the cross-sectioning. I came down over the line and took force report [and] c. [and] c. Will return to the lake in the A.M. I expect to put in next week until Friday at that place cross-sectioning. Will you please to have Archie come over for us next Thursday so he can return with us on Friday next, July 25. I am anxious to finish at the lake up to there.

 

We have in some way let the screw off the spindle of the level, a hell of a [] if it comes apart when picked up unless very carefully handled. Can you send us another level until this one can be sent in for repairs. Any other can do in work for a few moments.

 

Yours truly,

Wm. J. Gould

 

---

 

Cedar River

July 19, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst Engineer

 

This week test pits were dug on the banks of Cedar River. On the south side the pits were sunk to a depth of six feet through loam and a fine compacted gravel bed. Through this the sounding rods could not be forced so I used heavier steel and drove drills through the gravel and small sized boulders to a total depth of twelve feet from the surface.

 

On the north side however, the pits reached from 3 to 4 feet in a depth to a bed of large boulders. Between these we tried to force drills but they seldom reached own over 8 or 9 inches. In no place could we get over 5 feet from the surface.

 

Sounding are now being made on the Williams Ck. crossing in Section 8.

 

Resp’y yours,

Fred E. Case

 

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Raging River Camp

July 23, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst. Eng’r

Durham Wash.

 

Dear Sir

 

I have just returned from Echo Lake where we today finished cross-sectioning the bluff. It was slow tedious work owing to the amount of loose materials [and] the broken surface of the rocks []. Besides the contractors have only [] the [], logs [and] rubbish along this part of the hill in the edge of the lake in rare instances but 16 or 17 [feet] from the center line so that other stakes in many cases came into one [and[ another.

 

From about Sta. 321 to 323 [plus] 80 the lower slopes of the embankment extend out into the lake from 10 to 20 feet short of where the 1 1/2 to 1 slope moved over to water of undetermined depths. As far as we [] with any sanding facilities or []. The slope of the bottom of the lake is a uniform slop of about 8 ft. in 10 ft. or nearly 1 to 1. Would it not be well to arrange for either a crib in lee of a slope wall of dry rubble laid at a slope of 1 to 1 say? There will be plenty of good rocks handy to build a good slope wall as the excavation progresses.

 

E. H. Roudall the sub-contractor who has this bluff work has taken his entire force away to his work at Cedar River. They left last Friday.

 

Yours truly,

Wm. J. Gould

Resd’t Eng’r.

 

---

 

Raging River Camp

July 25, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Ass’t Eng’r

Durham Wash.

 

Dear Sir

 

Herewith I hand you the following bills:

One dated July 25 of Charles Rasmussen for Beef furnished my camp between June 27 [and] July 16 inclusive [and] amounting to $13.74.

 

One dated July 24 of C. W. Griggs for board of [] [and] party at Echo Lake between July 14 [and] 24: 211 meals [at] .25 each = $62/75 less $7.45 [] $ 45.30.

 

One dated July 24 of C. W. Griggs for feed [] pack horses 1 bale hay 165 [pounds] [at] 2 1/4 [cents] = 3.71 [and] 1 bag oats $2.50  $6.21.

 

One dated July 25 of Charles Rassmussen for work on trail [and] digging Test Pits between June 26 [and] July 7 between Stations 25 [and] 54 “D” line amounting in all to $94.88.

 

Total amount of all bills = $160.12.

 

The bill for feed and pack horses I did not “OK” as Archies knows but about the amounts: The board bill is correct as to items: I think the prices stop! Send your limit attached to it if the bill of provisions we furnished. Rasmussen’s bill for extra work is correct to items. The prices are higher than my estimate [and] he includes the work he did in moving the trail along his work to beyond the right-of-way. Work I have authority to include.

 

Yours truly,

Wm. J. Gould

Res’t Engr.

 

---

 

Martin

July 27, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett Esq

Ass’t Engr

Durham

 

Dear Sir,

 

I want to send Evans down to examine a new Sand Pit near Coal Creek on Tuesday. Would you please loan him one of your Velocipedes to go down there for a few hours? Please answer by wire and oblige.

 

Yours Truly,

Andrew Gibson, A.E.

 

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Cedar River

July 31, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Ass’t Engineer –

 

Five test pits have been dug at Bear Ck Crossing Sta. 195. Those on the north side being from four to six feet deep and showing a loam and gravel covering about 3 feet. deep and below that the rocks will not reach the size classified as loose rock. On the south side one shows a face of 8 feet and reaching into the boulders that are small in size and can be easily spread by blasting.

 

My examination of these pits satisfies me of the expediency of driving piles for foundation.

 

My cook left this morning and I did not give him an order for a certificate as the rolls were finished and sent to headquarters. Have engaged a man who cooked for Lager a few days and gives promise of doing fairly well. Please send me some letter heads F 290 and C. D. 12.

 

Resp’y yours

Fred E. Case

 

Signed pay roll for June enclosed.

 

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Ranging River Camp

August 2, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst. Engr.

Durham Wash.

 

Dear Sir,

 

There are constantly little accidents happening in or about camp such as cuts, bruises, burns [and] c. [and] c.

 

Mr. Cook, a day or two since, cut his leg quite badly from which he is laid off [and] will be for a day or two longer. We find that we needed, very badly, a few surgical [appurtenances], such as adhesive plaster, a surgeon’s scalpel. [] Will the Co. not furnish us a few such articles? Especially the adhesion plaster. If the articles can be had will you please send them out.

 

Yours truly,

Wm. J. Gould

Res’t. Engr.

 

---

 

Cedar River

August 4, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett Esq.

Asst Engineer: --

 

Soundings have been made at Sta. 161 “B.” The pits are down about 3 feet through gravel and loose rock and land on a bed of boulders. These could probably be forced by blasting cut taking into consideration the small amount of water flowing in the West Branch. I should say that sill would be more advisable as they would have a firm bearing. The material already in the slopes and being added made it impossible to dig pits on the sides but the prospect holes opened on the west side of the creek showed a ledge of solid rock as you will remember. Will send notes of Cedar River dump by pack train in the morning.

 

Resp’y yours,

Fred E. Case

 

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Cedar River

Aug 5, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst Engineer

 

On the south side of Cedar River the present end of dump is at Sta. 359+61 and the toe of slope at 359+91. 1060 yds of rock have made about 1700 yds of embankment the expansion being in this case 60 [percent] and from what remains to be taken out I calculate the final E. D. to be Sta. 360 and the toe of slope at 360+30.

 

Resp’y yours,

Fred E. Case

 

The present force in this cut is 2 cars and 9 men and the material has been taken out to Sta. 358. Have everything in very good shape at this end of the line and now can come down any day to make the location to Kangley Mine. Case.

 

---

 

Cedar River

August 6, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst. Engineer –

If you can still get one of those good cooks from Tacoma you spoke to me about please do so. The cook I have is a very fair one and satisfactory to us all but has asked to be relieved in order to go to Montana.

 

Resp’y yours,

Fred E. Case

 

Will either bring or send notes of levels on Cedar River to-morrow morning. The boys are down the line and could not get back in time to take them this day.

 

---

 

Cedar River

Aug. 10, 1890

 

Mr. Wm. J. Gould

Resident Engr.

Raging River Camp

 

Dear Sir:

 

I believe that for some time the packers have been instructed to being me some of your table ware as you had enough for a locating party, but they always forget it so I write to you direct.

 

I am short in dishes, cups, spoons and small pans for table service and would be greatly obliged if you could send me some on this trip.

 

Strife [and] dissension instead of railroad building is mostly in order on this side and the heaviest sub contractor has thrown over his work and left the country. They are all kicking more or less and making affairs as unpleasant as possible.

 

One mile of track laid to date and nothing new.

 

Yours truly,

Fred E. Case

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs

Railroad Contractor

Corner 23d and Adams Sts.

 

Tacoma, Wash., August 11, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett, Esq.,

Asst. Engineer, Durham, Wash.,

 

My Dear Sir:

 

Your favor of Aug. 9th received in relation to progress of work on the line. I am sorry that we are not getting along as fast as you desire and also on account of our own interests. I had supposed from the amount of money and expense that I had invested on that line that the work was far ahead of what you report. I have advanced more than double to my subs and otherwise than what my estimates have been so far, and if we have received nearly full estimates on our work I fear it will need a bank to carry me through. Owing to the excessive rains that we had during the first two months of this work it was almost impossible to crowd it any faster than we did, but now we are bringing everything to bear to get more men and to keep the force that we have going as rapidly as possible. In talking with Principal Assistant Engineer Huson Saturday, he said that he desired of course to have this work go forward as speedily as I could do it but that the necessities of the company were on the Tacoma, Olympia [and] Grays Harbor R. R., which he wanted me to finish on time and bend all of our energies in that direction, and that other contracts would be subject to that. Still it is my intention to get this work through unless the rains interfere or other obstacles which we are not able to overcome.

 

I feel sure from your standing that you will do every thing possible you can to assist us in getting along in the best shape possible and give me a good classification of the work

 

This letter may be handed to you by either Mr. Foster or my son and I shall endeavor to visit you within the next few days and see what Supt. Reardon and Mr. King are doing on the line.

 

Yours very truly,

C. W. Griggs

 

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Cedar River

August 13, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst Engineer

 

Please furnish me with Ham, Bacon, Axe Handle, Timber Sticks, Oat Meal.

 

Resp’y

Fred E. Case

 

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Cedar River Wash

August 19, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Ass’t Engineer

Durham.

 

Dear Sir.

 

The following shows the quantity of material taken out of the three cuts in Section 8 worked by Dingle and Revane, Sub Contractors.

 

Cut at Sta. 159 Section 8 measured Aug. 16, 1890

844 Cu Yds Cement Gravel

2523 Cu Yds Earth

1 Sta Grubbing

 

Cut at Sta. 163 Section 8 measured August 18, 1890

2008 Cu Yds Cement Gravel

2007 Cu Yds Earth

2 Sta. Grubbing

 

Cut at Sta. 171 Section 8 measured August 18, 1890

25 Cu Yds Solid Rock

770 Cu Yds Loose Rock

2386 Cu Yds Cement Gravel

4773 Cu Yds Earth

2 Sta. Grubbing

 

Correct,

Fred E. Case

Resident Engineer

 

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Cedar River

August 26, 1890

Frank Bartlett, Esq.

Asst Eng’r

 

Dear Sir

 

Herewith I send you signed pay rolls with checks from G. H. Lett [and] J. [] enclosed. Also time returns and property record for August 1890.

 

You will notice the consumption of a metallic tape; in place of my requisition for one for pile inspector some days ago please make it two (2). Enclosed is also my report on injury to Young and Sons Transit No. 5295.

 

Mr. Bartlett was just here and told me to have you ship it to Tacoma with this report and Mr. H[erbert] S. Huson [Principal Assistant Engineer] to ship another transit immediately as ours is broken and we have no other. Please ask if it will be out on this afternoon’s train and, if so, Smith will wait for it.

 

Reply,

Fred E. Case

 

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Martin, Wash., Sept 4, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett Esq

Ass’t Eng.

Durham Wash.

 

Dear Sir

 

If you should happen to be passing the Sand Bank bear Cedar River within a few day’s would you kindly look and the sand and let me know what you think of it.

 

Also please state if you have track laid on the Branch as far as the Sand Bank.

 

When I meet you in Tacoma will make it all right. Why in hell didn’t you come up here before we quit arching?

 

Yours [and] C.

Andrew Gibson

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs,

Contractor,

Cor. 23d and Adams Sts.,

 

Tacoma, Wash., Sept. 5, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett Esq,

Kangley, Wash.,

 

Dear Sir:-

 

Will you please advise me if the timber put in and estimated as timber-culverts was included in Inspectors report of timber received by the Railroad Company. Please also advise me if the Inspectors report covers timber supplied for false-work, as I notice there is some 16,000 feet sawed for that purpose last month.

 

Yours truly,

C. W. Griggs

 

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Martin, Wash., Sept 10, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett Esq

Asst Eng

Durham

 

Dear Sir

 

This will be handed to you by Wm. Kay, our timekeeper at the Tunnel. Would you please loan Wm. Kay one of your velocipedes. He is going to look at a Sand Pit down towards Enumclaw. The Roadmaster tells me there is some good sand down the road. Have you seen the Sand Pit on your work near Cedar River?

 

Yours Very Truly,

Andrew Gibson

 

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Cedar River

Sept 10, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst Engineer

 

Dear Sir: --

 

A force of 14 men are now at work on Cedar River bridge. Caps, stringers and sills are in position and bolted on the south side and cabs and corbels are in place on pile abutment. Erection of bents will be started to-morrow (Thursday). No work has been done on north side. I will be obliged to go to town to-morrow for half a day to have my eye cauterized. The doctor performed this operation a year a ago but the trouble is returning and I cannot use my eyes at all.

 

Respectfully yours,

Fred E. Case,

Resident Engr.

 

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Cedar River

Sept 12, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst Engineer

 

Dear Sir:

 

The bents are all up on the south side of Cedar River and sway and lateral bracing in place. The posts fit well except on the 15/16 inch batten where the inside posts show from 1/4 to 1/2 inch space between bottom of posts and the dap in sills. This is on four bents. I have measured the posts and found them to be framed correctly. The weight of stringers and general floor system may spring them into place but if not, 1/4 inch can be chiseled from the bottom of the posts (outer) and it will settle without showing in the grade.

 

Respectfully yours,

Fred E. Case

Res. Engr.

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs,

Railroad Contractor,

Cor. 23d and Adams Sts.,

 

Tacoma, Wash., Sept. 12, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett Esq,

Asst. Engr.

Kangley, Wash.,

 

Dear Sir:-

 

Your favor of the 10th, received, and was very glad indeed to hear from you. The estimate for Timber labor and construction of buildings will all go to J. J. Maney who has the entire contract for the work on that line. I suppose our Mr. King, or Supt. Reardon have notified you.

 

Yours very truly,

C. W. Griggs

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs,

Contractor,

Corner 23d and Adams Sts.,

Tacoma, Wash.

 

Kangley, Sept 18, 1890

 

G. B. Williams Esq

 

Dear Sir:

 

I do not think it advisable to let the Engine go yet as the bridge man has got things considerably mixed and think you had better hold engine here a day or two longer.

 

Yours Truly,

E. Reardon

 

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Cedar River

September 18, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett Esq.

Asst Engineer

 

Dear Sir: --

 

Please change my requisitions for bridge material in the following items: --

 

Frame Bent Trestle Sec. 5 Sta. 355

102 track stringers

34 Jack stringers

 

Pile Trestle Sec. 5 Sta. 312+50

24 track stringers

8 Jack stringers

 

Pile Trestle Sec. 6 Sta. 301

24 track stringers

8 Jack stringers

 

Frame Bent Trestle Sec. 7 Sta. 215

60 track stringers

20 Jack stringers

 

Resp’y yours

Fred E. Case

Res. Engr.

 

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Cedar River

Sept 18, 1890

 

Mr. Frank Bartlett

Asst Engineer

 

Dear Sir: --

 

Please send for a $40.00 Chainman to be here next Monday as Archie O’Callaghan has tendered his resignation.

 

Resp’y yours

Fred E. Case

 

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Cedar River

Sept. 20, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett, Esq.

Asst Engineer

 

Dear Sir: --

 

Enclosed please find general force report and report on sections for Cedar River Residency. The following supplies are needed in my camp. Milk, Salt, Cabbage, Cheers, Coal Oil, Candles. Can I get another Chinese lamp with reflector?

 

Resp’y yours

Fred E. Case

 

---

 

F. Bartlett, Esq.

Durham.

 

Sept. 22, 1890

 

Dear Sir,

 

L. M. Lundgren at present is hauling from Sta 274 D Line to Sta 295+50, a distance of about 2200 ft. Can he not waste in cut at 274, and borrow at 295+50 or thereabouts and be allowed for the same.

 

C[harles] Rasmussen, Sub-Contractor, is hauling from Sta 23 to Stat 7 D Line, it is an uphill haul and very wet. Will you now allow him to borrow between Sta 7 and 12 D Line, and waste cut between Sta 21 and 25+50, and allow him for same.

 

This is very expensive work and our sub-contractors are losing money daily.

 

Yours truly,

E. Reardon

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs,

Railroad Contractor,

Cor. 23d and Adams Sts.,

 

Tacoma, Wash., Sept. 26, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett Esq,

Asst. Engr., Kangley, Wash.,

 

Dear Sir:-

 

Herewith please find bills as enumerated below for extra labor and material furnished in August.

Lumber for Coal-bin $35.57

Oiling Bolts in Mtl. Yard 20.54

Labor on Echo Lake Trail 276.10

Horse Shoeing 4.00

Loading Steel and Fastenings 2.80

$339.01

 

Please approve and forward payment.

 

Yours truly,

C. W. Griggs

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs,

Contractor,

Corner 23d and Adams Sts.,

Tacoma, Wash.

 

Palmer, Wash., Oct 3, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett Esq,

Durham.

 

Dear Sir,

 

When are you going to furnish me with the balance of flat cars, ordered some time ago. I am working with two flat cars at present, I have fooled away time long enough. Please let me know at your earliest convenience, whether I am to continue [] work with two cars, or more.

 

Yours truly,

E. Reardon

 

---

 

Cedar River

Oct 14, 1890

 

Frank Bartlett

Asst. Engineer: --

 

In the matter of final estimates given last month, the entire quantities were given to Ed Roundaw, J. N. Faye and Son, Peter Swauberger and to Peter Logan for his work on section 6. To the last three sub contractors there is an item of extra haul due them, otherwise these estimates were final. The proposition for obtaining meat is entirely satisfactory to me. In addition to the supplies rec’d to-day the following articles are necessary: Salt, Rice, Cabbage, Turnips, Cheese, Lard.

 

Yours truly,

Fred E. Case

Resident Engineer

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs,

Contractors,

23rd and Adams Streets,

Tacoma, Wash.

 

G. R. + N. R. R. “Front”

Oct 20, 1890

 

Wm. Gould Asst Engr,

Durham, Wash.

 

Dear Sir:

 

The conductor of the train Mr. Jones reports to me this A. M. that he will have to go to Palmer tonight for Coal. Will you not please order for our use three or four cars enough to fill the bin at the material yard, so that we may have a constant supply on hand [and] avoid having to apply so frequently to the operating dep’t.

 

I remain

Yours respectfully

E. Reardon Supt.

 

---

 

Cedar River

Oct 29, 1890

 

W. J. Gould Esq.

Assistant Engineer

 

Dear Sir: --

 

It is necessary for me, in the October estimate, to have the fist seven miles finished entirely in the matter of grading so that there will be no confusion hereafter in regard to these miles. Such items as ditching, etc., would be hard to follow by a person unacquainted with the work, so I will put in record book in pencil notes everything up to the 8th mile. To save working it all out twice, I am doing that now and making estimate at the same time. It will therefore be some time to-morrow before I can get it all in shape so you can take notes to Tacoma. Will have affairs in such shape that I will leave at the same time and we can go in together to-morrow night.

 

Resp’y yours

Fred E. Case

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs,

Contractors,

23rd and Adams Streets,

Tacoma, Wash.

 

Williams Creek

November 3, 1890

 

Wm. Gould Asst Engr,

Durham.

 

Dear Sir,

 

Mr. [Charles] Rasmussen makes us the following report on his work, in Oct. The cuts at Stas 21 + 19 and 25 + 18 cost him $1061.73 which does not include labor, in making rails [and] blacksmith labor on tools [and] c. The haul is now 1500 ft. up grade and the material is such that very slow progress can be made, being wet and very hard, consisting of sand-rock, hard clay and bounders mixed.

 

Will you kindly inform me of what the quantities and classifications were in these two pieces of work.

 

Yours truly,

E. Reardon, Supt.

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs

Contractor

23rd and Adams Streets

Tacoma, Wash.

 

William Creek

November 7, 1890

 

W. T. Gould Asst Engr,

Durham.

 

Dear Sir,

 

We require a switch at Sta. 314 B Line. You have the frog at the material yard, also the Banner switch stand but no connecting rods, or connecting bridle for same. You have several Elliott connecting bridals but they will not answer for the Banner stand. Will you please furnish the Banner connecting rods and bridal for the stub switch as soon as convenient.

 

Engine 218 is in very bad shape, the springs under forward trucks are broken, air pipe connections are broken, steam chest are leaking so badly that it is not safe working with her. Pilot is also dragging on rail. We will have to let her go to the shop on Saturday P. M. Will you please notify Master Mechanic at Tacoma, before his arrival there so he will be prepared to commence work on her, on her arrival Saturday night, so as she can get back on Monday A. M. for work.

 

Yours truly,

E. Reardon.

 

---

 

Raging River

November 15, 1890

 

Wm. J. Gould

Ass’t Eng’r

Durham

 

Dear Sir

 

Contractors quit work on Thursday the 18th. The cut from Sta 168 to 174 “B” was finished the 14th and 13th. The culvert men will finish the one under way today.

Surfacing Crew is still at work.

 

Geo. H. Cook

Resdt Eng’r

 

---

 

C. W. Griggs,

Contractors,

23rd and Adams Streets,

Tacoma, Wash.

 

Williams Creek

November 20, 1890

 

Wm. Gould Asst Engr,

Durham.

 

Dear Sir,

 

Will you kindly loan me two Aparahoes to use tomorrow. These is a large stove at Rasmussen that I wish to move to [] Camp, and pack saddles hardly answer the purpose.

 

Yours truly,

E. Reardon.

 

---

 

Griggs and Huestis

Railroad Contractors

Corner 23d and Adams Sts.

 

Tacoma, Wash., Nov. 28, 1890

 

Wm. T. Gould Esq,

Asst. Engr., Durham, Wash.,

 

Dear Sir:-

 

Your favor of the 26th, received in regard to carelessness of mend handling hand-car. I shall write to the Superintendent this morning, that if this thing occurs again the men will be dis-charged and held accountable for negligence [and] c. Trust there will be no further complaint on this score.

 

Yours truly,

C. W. Griggs

 

---

 

Durham

Dec. 19, 1890

 

H. S. Huson, Esq.

Prin. Asst. Engineer.

 

Dear Sir,

 

The flooring for section house was found to be short 150 ft. B.M. Will measure, and I borrowed this quantity from the Pacific Investment Co. so as not to delay the work and hold the carpenters unnecessarily.

 

Yours truly,

Wm. J. Gould

Asst. Engineer.

 

 

 




PLACES

From the Tacoma Public Libary, Northwest Room, Washington State Place Name Database.

Barneston (S.13;T.22N;R.7W) - Barneston was once small logging community on the Cedar River seventeen miles east of Kent in central King County. The name was selected when a post office was established on June 12, 1901. It was for John G. Barnes of Seattle, who once owned much of the property.

http://www.tpl.lib.wa.us/cgi-win/placcgi2.exe/id=479

 

 

Cedar River (Ts.21,22N;Rs.5-11E) - The Cedar River rises in two forks on the western slope of the crest of the Cascades in southeast King County and flows northwest through Seattle's watershed to Cedar Lake, then west and northwest by way of Renton to the Duwamish River at Black River Junction. It is a principal source of Seattle's domestic water supply. Indian tribal names for the river were Quab-quo and Nook-noo.

http://www.tpl.lib.wa.us/cgi-win/placcgi2.exe/id=1267

 

Durham (S.2;T.21N;R.7E) - Durham began as a mining camp between Kangley and Kanaskat ten miles northeast of Enumclaw in southwest King County. It was founded as a coal mine by the Moss Bay Iron & Steel Company, a British corporation. It was named by the founders for Durham, England, which also is in a coal-mining region.

http://www.tpl.lib.wa.us/cgi-win/placcgi2.exe/id=2150

 

Echo Lake (S.2;T.23N;R.7E) - Echo Lake is at the head of Lake Creek two and a quarter miles southwest of Snoqualmie in central King County. The name is fairly descriptive, according to nearby residents. Another Echo Lake is in northwest King County.

http://www.tpl.lib.wa.us/cgi-win/placcgi2.exe/id=2222

 

Halmar (S.25;T.23N;R.7E) - This community was founded as Kerriston in 1904 but in late 1905 that name was transferred a mile and a half north to be near a post office named Kerriston in King County. In 1914 the railroad station of Halmar was established. It was named for Hal and Marion Brew whose father T.E. Brew owned a Puyallup logging company. (Railroad List.).

http://www.tpl.lib.wa.us/cgi-win/placcgi2.exe/id=3083

 

Kanaskat (S.10;T.21N;R.7E) - Kanaskat is a community on the north bank of the Green River eight miles northeast of Enumclaw in south central King County. It is reported to have been named for a Yakima Indian sub-chief, who had a wife living in the region while the rest of his family lived in the Yakima country.

http://www.tpl.lib.wa.us/cgi-win/placcgi2.exe/id=3679

 

Kangley (S.26;T.22N;R.7E) - Kangley is a community on a small tributary of the Green River, eleven miles northeast of Issaquah in southwest King County. It was named by the Northern Pacific Railway for John Kangley, general manager of Northern Pacific Coal Company in 1889. Alternate names were Kangley Junction and Durham Junction. A railroad depot was built in 1906 and abandoned in 1920. (Railroad List).

http://www.tpl.lib.wa.us/cgi-win/placcgi2.exe/id=3685

 

Kerriston (S.25;T.23N;R.7E) - Kerriston was once an important logging center on the upper Raging River four miles west of Cedar Falls in central King County. It was named for A. S. Kerry, president of Kerry Timber Company, which cut timber in the early 1900s. A railroad station called Kerriston was established in 1900 but was moved six miles in 1904 when the original Kerriston station became known as Hemlock.

http://www.tpl.lib.wa.us/cgi-win/placcgi2.exe/id=3732

 

Palmer (S.15;T.21N;R.7E) - Palmer is a community on the Green River above the Green River Gorge eight miles northeast of Enumclaw in south central King County. It was named Green River Siding in 1885 by officials of Northern Pacific Railway Company. In 1888, they changed the station to the present name for George L. Palmer, a timber cruiser for Northern Pacific Land Company, and later superintendent of a coal mine at nearby Durham. Palmer Junction, a mile to the east, has the same name origin.

http://www.tpl.lib.wa.us/cgi-win/placcgi2.exe/id=5582




Author: John A. Phillips, III. Title: The Green River and Northern Railroad, 1890. URL: www.netcom.com/~whstlpnk/grandn.html.

© March 20, 2002

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